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I have the thank my new friend Karen Ingalls who posted a question on Linkedin, “how hard is it to get friends or family to write a review of your work, even though they said they liked/loved your book?”

This was the only question on the thread that struck me as a relevant question, because I’ve had the same issue. Being a hairdresser has helped me get necessary feedback. As I wrote my first novel, Uncle Otto, I’d bring snippets/chapters for my clients to review.

At first they were lukewarm, and as I progressed it went to that’s amazing. The good thing was I had a chance to see my progress as the reviews got better. With those responses as a comparison, I felt I could trust their critique.

Another clue, that it’s a legitimate response, is when the reader engages in questions about a character or a scene. One client observed in Uncle Otto that she could actually see the heavy down pour, and feel her feet being sucked in the mud, that made the characters trek arduous to say the least.

After finishing Uncle Otto, while still in manuscript form, I had several of my clients read it, and received great reviews, and a few wrote reviews. I felt I was home free. I had no idea how hard it would be to get friends/family to write reviews; even though they loved it. Some did write great reviews, but most didn’t. I’ve read for several book clubs, and most did write good reviews on Amazon.com.

So, the take away from this question, “how hard is it to get friends or family to write a review of your work, even though they said they liked/loved it;” seek reviews from professionals, there are plenty online, or anyone that is willing to read and review your work. Don’t depend on family or friends for their support; what’s love gotta do with i?

I suppose that’s why I’m writing this blog; to shine light on my two novels Uncle Otto and Wayfarers. Visit my website, www.winfredcook.com and read some of the reviews from readers who read and loved each book.

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